7/30/13

Geo Domains - Lesson Learned

Guest post by the co-worker and friend of mine that got me into domaining.  I appreciate him sharing this experience with us, so we can continue to learn from what other domainers have been through. - in this case, getting a cease and desist letter. 

A few years ago I started playing around with registering some .com and .net geo domains and building them out with some decent content with a goal of bringing in just a little extra monthly, passive income.  I didn't really expect to sell any of them, or even receive any offers, and as I expected I never did.  However, Google seemed to like what I had did with the content and most of the sites ranked fairly well within just a few months and I started getting daily clicks on ads.  I was pretty happy with my experiment and it brought in another $50 or so each month.

What I failed to realize while registering the names is that all of them were non-trademarked, government owned nature parks......except for one.  I blindly assumed it was a non-trademarked name just like all the others and went about my business developing the site out.  For a couple years I was ranked on page 1 of Google for the keyword name of the nature park my site was about and the site actually performed better than any of my other geo domain sites.  I thought all was well....

Earlier this year I received a nasty cease and desist letter from a law firm representing the private company that owns the nature park.  On top of it being a privately owned company, the name of the park is also trademarked.  Bad news.  I had no idea what to do but fortunately I have a good friend that's a lawyer and though he's not an intellectual property or domain name lawyer, he was able to guide me through the process.

The first thing he recommended is what got me through it quickly and without paying a dime:  he instructed me to immediately give up the name to them (per their demand in the C&D letter) and to respond to them professionally and apologize (despite how nasty the tone of the letter was...).  In my opinion, all I was doing was helping drive more attention to them and helping to bring them visitors....but they didn't see it that way.  My friend assisted me with obtaining a settlement agreement which the other party signed and I was good to go.

It was pretty easy to tell during this transaction that the company has the law firm on retainer which is why they most likely didn't try to come at me for anything other than the name.  I have a feeling someone brought it to the owner's attention and they didn't like the fact that another site was out there somehow "falsely" misrepresenting them (again...I didn't see it that way...) and so they sent their attorney after me to get the name.

I suppose it could have been a lot worse....but definitely a lesson learned.

7/6/13

The Legitimate List of Available Domain Names #5

It's been a while... here's the newest list of names with a few pairs again:

Legitimate Available Domain Names
Name
Monthly Search
Est. Price
Ask Price
ElectricBillingSystem.com
91
$499
$495
EkkiMats.com
58
$449
$249
HomeOxygenBar.com
110
$499
$549
CauteryPen.com
480
$449
$495
DomesticElevator.com
36
$499
$295
DentalXrayMachine.com
91
$499
$649
DentalX-rayMachines.com
110
$449
$249
PlasmaCutterTorch.com
73
$499
$249
LogLoadingTrailer.com
28
$499
$249
StageTrussSystem.com
58
$499
$249
GasConveyorPizzaOven.com
36
$449
$249
LargeFormatPrinting.co
5,400
$399
$495
BabyUrns.com
260
$499
$495
GoKartWrap.com
<10
$499
$295
GoKartWraps.com
58
$499
$295
AircraftTowingEquipment.com
58
$499
$249
BungeeTandem.com
28
$499
$249
ZincPlatingKit.com
320
$449
$495
RoastChickenMachine.com
28
$449
$395
MobileCarLifts.com
58
$420
$595
Monthly Search: Google global monthly exact match keyword
Estimate Price: Provided by Sedo's Big Data Pricer
Ask Price: Rookie Domainer's recommended asking price

If you're ready to grab one of these names, hit up @RookieDomainer for the latest coupon codes and then register the name(s) at GoDaddy before somebody else does!
Don't let some of the exact matches or estimate values fool you - a domain is worth what someone is willing to pay for it.  Sometimes I find the names that I never thought I'd flip, I did with relative ease and the easy names I got stuck with.  If anyone decides to buy and flip these - I'd love to hear about it! Best of luck!!!

Be sure to check our prior lists for names that may still be available to hand reg:

6/14/13

Email Extractor Makes Finding Potential Buyers Much Easier!

I teased my discovery of this new helpful tool a few weeks back.  Email Extractor allows you to scour websites via a keyword or phrase thru multiple search engines to gather email addresses.  The interface is super simple and the return is great.  You only need to weed out dummy and irrelevant email addresses as the program can't tell you which emails you specifically would care to send a domain sales solicitation to.  This definitely can be considered spammy, but I fall back on that I clean the list up to only the email addresses for the businesses I see a possible interest in the domain name I'm looking to flip.  It's only available for the PC and you can download it for free here: http://emailextractorpro.com/download.html The free version lets you do everything except export the list, so you can try it out as much as you like.  I dropped the $44.95 to unlock the full version and flipped a name my first go around.  I'm glad I did it because it takes much less time to generate 2-3x the amount of emails to contact.
Check out the video review:


Let me know what you think if you have used or begin using Email Extractor.  Also, got any other tools or tips for domainers we haven't mentioned on the blog - please share with us, we're always looking to learn more!!!

6/9/13

The Good Email Responses

Not too long ago, I shared the angry email response I received from the angry Canadian (no offense to Canadians) web IT guy (no offense to web IT... well, never mind) that was upset I contacted one of his clients soliciting a name.  Those don't happen often, but when they do, they can sting a bit.
Fortunately, most replies are positive and I wanted to share two recent ones:

Thank you.

What I find unusual, is it's not often someone will push a domain before payment is made.  I am constantly on the lookout for whatever scam is being presented, and ALWAYS have that watchful eye working overtime.

Then after I offered $400 for the one domain, you included the second.  This too was unexpected.

Thanks again!

It's stuff like this that makes domaining fun for me.  I invest some time, spend a few bucks, identify someone that will find value from it, and make a little money.  They're happy and so am I!

Most email responses from clients are not as complimentary as the one above, but even something like this, from the Vice President of a company, can make me smile:

Thank you for your help. I will keep you in mind!

She's keeping me in mind because in all my sale-close emails, I thank them for their business and offer any domain service I might be able to assist with now or in the future.  I've had near a dozen flips to clients I've sold names to before.  It's worth developing and maintaining those relationships.  Keep your head up, keep registering names, be persistent... your day and good emails will come!

5/28/13

Manual Renew or Auto-Renew?

That is the question.  The answer is: it depends.  For me, the bargain domainer, it's all about the manual renew and here's my reasons why:
  1. I can use coupon codes. Generally, I can score a .com renewal for $8 with GoDaddy.  The auto-renew will usually get you paying full price $12-$14.  You can manual renew before the auto-renew date, but I enjoy the many email reminders I get.  In the past, before I switched everything to manual renew, sometimes my laziness would keep from manually renewing before the auto-renew so I got stuck paying full freight.
  2. It forces me to better manage my domain inventory (in theory!).  I constantly get email reminders to renew names, several of which I do.  Others, I make a list ditch effort to flip but then choose to let them expire.
The reality of #2, is sometimes I get lazy (like I said in #1!) and forget to log in and renew, as I did recently with my main hosted site... thus when my email went down, I was instantly perplexed.  Until I realized I neglected to manual renew the name before the cancellation process started.  No worries!  I immediately signed in and renewed the name - crisis averted.  Although, this is the reason many folks would heavily, strongly, intensely recommend auto-renew.  If you're a big time domainer with a gigantic portfolio and jet setting the globe, then auto-renew is for you.  If you're a small time noob domainer operating on a shoe string budget like me, stick with manual renew and follow me on Twitter for up-to-date, working GoDaddy coupon codes including renewal codes.

5/24/13

Recent Domain Flip Success and a New Tool

I hadn't flipped a name in a few weeks and was recently accosted via email from an IT guy representing one of his clients that I solicited for potential purchase of a domain name.  Needless to say, I needed a positive domain experience and I got it.
A few week backs, I bought a singular and plural with the hopes to sell them to a prior client.  He respectfully declined and I had been sitting on the names.  This week's purchase (my commitment of buying and trying to flip one domain per week has not yet wavered!) is another name that I'm waiting on another client to see if he wants, so I decided to revisit the singular and plural from a few weeks back and actually try to sell them.
Parallel to this, I have a another venture, Grub-On, that I was interested in scouring the Internet for email addresses of restaurants for marketing purposes.  I contacted a tech friend of mine to see if he knew a way for me to get them, but he wasn't home.  I googled and found the answer to my spammy email prayers - email extractor programs.  I found one (to be demo'd on a future post here!) that let me run it for free to confirm it works.  To download the list, which I wanted to with over 40 good emails, I paid around $44 for the registration.  I immediately sent my email asking $695 for the pair of names.
I woke up to an email countering at $400. I accepted and by 3pm this afternoon, the customer had his two domain names and I have $400 in Paypal.  The email extractor paid for itself.  I am basking in hand reg flipping success this evening, made easier by my email extractor!

5/9/13

The Angry Response

Be prepared for it.  It happens.  Not often, but it does happen.  To put it in perspective, I attempt to flip one domain a week by soliciting 30 potential buyers at a minimum.  I get interested buyer responses for about 3 out of 10 names. I usually get 1 halfhearted low-ball buyer who was probably just replying to see if I was a bot or not.  Responding to that person has never resulted in a sale.  Then there's the angry response.  I get one every 6 months or so.  This one was a doozy:

F*@% OFF YOU F*@%ING PIECE OF SH!T!
SHOVE THE DOMAIN UP YOUR A$$!


In the past, I'd respond in kind but realized quickly that was a fruitless effort.  Then, I opted to ignore angry responders.  In the case of this one, I felt obligated to simply reply:

Wow. Do me a favor, let me know what email address or web contact form I actually sent to and I’ll make sure I never contact you again.
-Herb


I did this for two reasons.  First being, the email address he emailed me from wasn't one I contacted directly so I want to make sure where I found it and avoid it like the plague.  Two, I'm thinking this guy is just frustrated with spam mail and just took it out on what he probably thought was a bot and wouldn't reply to his rant - so part of me hopes he feels like an a$$ himself.  He hasn't replied yet, so maybe that's the case.

Be prepared for these to happen, on occasion.  Remain calm.  Don't lose your cool.  It's not worth your effort!

4/19/13

The Legit List of Available Domain Names

Here's the newest list of names with a few pairs again:

Legitimate Available Domain Names


Name
Monthly Search
Est. Price
Ask Price
HouseholdLifts.com
36
$0
$249
HouseholdLift.com
<10
$0
$249
LargeWashingMachine.com
210
$0
$249
LargeWashingMachines.com
140
$220
$449
TimberRoofing.com
110
$830
$1295
CoinOperatedDryer.com
260
$630
$995
BreadSlicingMachine.com
320
$400
$649
BreadSlicingMachines.com
36
$290
$495
CarnivalPrizesBulk.com
73
$270
$495
HennaSet.com
91
$5
$249
TandemBungee.com
170
$0
$249
CornSnakeCage.com
110
$460
$595
CornSnakeCages.com
46
$400
$495
BisonDogFood.com
210
$200
$349
SilentPiling.com
110
$470
$695
LARPKatana.com
170
$5
$249
LagoonPump.com
28
$0
$249
LagoonPumps.com
22
$0
$249
MobileCarLift.com
260
$310
$495
MobileCarLifts.com
58
$420
$595
Monthly Search: Google global monthly exact match keyword
Estimate Price: Provided by Estibot or Valuate
Ask Price: Rookie Domainer's recommended asking price

If you're ready to grab one of these names, hit up @RookieDomainer for the latest coupon codes and then register the name(s) at GoDaddy before somebody else does!
Don't let some of the exact matches or estimate values fool you - a domain is worth what someone is willing to pay for it.  Sometimes I find the names that I never thought I'd flip, I did with relative ease and the easy names I got stuck with.  If anyone decides to buy and flip these - I'd love to hear about it! Best of luck!!!

Be sure to check our prior lists for names that may still be available to hand reg:


 
Design by Wordpress Theme | Bloggerized by Free Blogger Templates | coupon codes